Aim Higher

Blog Drawing SquareI recently attended my 40th high school reunion.  During a conversation with a friend since elementary school (not an old friend—neither of us are old!) I was reminded of something one of the high school guidance counselors told me many years ago.  He explained it differently than I will here, but the concept is the same.  (Since we were face to face, he could talk with his hands as well.  That doesn’t work so well in a blog.)

Imagine a vertical line.  Near the top of the line is point A.  Around the middle is point B.  Near the bottom is point C.  He said that he would rather see students aim for point A and only achieve point B than to aim for point C and achieve it.  Even if they don’t achieve point A, by achieving point B they will have achieved more than if they settled for point C from the beginning.

At the time, I couldn’t begin to realize how important that concept is.  At least I grasped enough that it encouraged me to go for a bachelor’s degree rather than an associate degree after graduating high school.

I hate to admit it, but there have been times in my life when I did not try for point A because I did not think I could make it.  Sometimes I aimed for point B and got it, but sometimes I settled for point C when I could have done more had I aimed higher.

Have you done this?  Are you doing this now?  Could you achieve more if you aimed higher than you thought you could achieve?  What could your life be like if you did?

Aim Accurately

Aim Accurately (Video)

A problem that I have in golf is aiming.  Whenever I think that I am aiming at the pin, the ball goes to the right.  Consistently.  When I aim to the left of the pin, the ball goes straight for the pin.

As I thought about his, I realized that this could happen in our professional and personal lives as well.  We may think we are aiming for our goals.  However, if we consistently miss our goals, then something is wrong. 

Remember, there is no reality, only perception.  Our perception may be that we are aiming for our goals, but if the reality is that we are missing our goals, our aim may be off.

The most common correction is to change how or where we are aiming.

When I change how I am aiming for the pin, the ball goes toward the pin.  I have found that this is true in life, too.  There have been times when no matter how hard I try, I cannot reach a goal.  When I stop and analyze the situation, and how or where I am aiming, often I can then reach the goal.

If you are not meeting a professional or personal goal, stop and analyze how and where you are aiming.  You may have more success if you modify your aim.  Where you think you are aiming may not be where you are actually aiming.  It is the reality and perception concept again!